Ferocity tempered by ice-cold analysis at Goldsmiths MFA

Goldsmiths’ art students are ferociously angry, rightly so given the state of the world. But they use this furnace to temper their material into stark blocks of steel  that coolly reflect the idiocies surrounding them. Among the targets skewered by the moving image artists this year are crass gender stereotypes, corporate gobbledygook, medical arrogance and psychological vacuity.

Puck Verkade, Breeder

Puck Verkade

For her inventive marshalling of diverse sources and ideas into a cohesive whole, Verkade for me was the standout MI artist of the show. The three video episodes totalling 20 minutes are a playful but hard-hitting exploration of the politics of female reproduction with digressions into related issues. It integrates her own animations, archive clips (including Shirley Bassey, Boy George and moon shoots)  and features a stunning sequence as a baby chameleon emerges from its leathery egg. Directing three teenage girls to demonstrate the relevance of chickens and Cleopatra to gender and racial politics was handled with a confident sensitivity. At one point in a nod to post-modernism, Verkade steps out of the director’s omnipotent role during shooting to query with a black teenager whether a shot of her eating fried chicken would be seen as offensive stereotyping. She is acutely aware of language betraying cultural assumptions and her bold use of (covert?) sound recordings of women undergoing encounters with medical professionals is particularly startling for their honesty.  One of the video episodes is viewable at https://vimeo.com/224480565

Ian Gouldstone, Wanton Boys

Ian gouldstone

The title of this work is an attempt to invest it with profundity. I thought the dancing crosses  projected onto simple blocks evoking animal gravestones were quite amusing. So perhaps I am a “wanton boy” heartlessly looking down on the misfortunes of others. The idea of using software to generate random interaction between geometric figures is fun but also gives a new perspective on the meaningless absurdity of life.

Laura Yuile, Contactless Family #4

Laura Yuile

I was taken by Yuile’s background commentary, sourced I assume from found audio featuring  smooth corporate sales pitches that ratchet up the paranoia of environmental contamination and disruption of the home environment: “Do not allow two mirrors to reflect each other,” the feng shui advisor smugly urges. This is extended to an exploration of the idea that the smarthome has a consciousness and its ill health will act on the family that resides there. Her digital processing, scrambling and fuzzing the images, arrestingly conveys that the boundary between the environment and the self is becoming blurred, a disconcerting but prescient idea. More info at http://www.laurayuile.com/

Tom Varley, The Personality Test

Tom Varley

This was absolutely thrilling and very funny. Initially I read it as a parody of a dire counselling session with the counsellor mirroring verbatim the depressed self-statements of the client according to Rogerian non-judgemental orthodoxy which only leads to him sinking more deeply into his depression. But it becomes apparent that the entire script is taken from the statements that feature in the woeful personality tests that we are all subjected to in the cause of refining the recruitment filter for whatever organisation we are seeking to join. As scenes progress the mood fluctuates wildly from delight to anger to sarcasm as the actors do a sterling job giving alternative interpretations of the banal profiling statements such as “I enjoy meeting other people.” Introducing melodramatic classical themes like Mahler’s 5th Symphony at dramatic points provides a humorous counterpoint to the turbulent emotions. This film is a devastating practical debunking of scientific psychology’s futile attempt to grasp the complexity of the human  condition. Brilliant.

Michal Plata, Bodies and Dark-metal

michal plataAs an ex-BMW designer, Plata has an interesting background for an artist. His two videos take muscular strength as a signifier of masculinity as their starting point. Interview clips reveal competitors for the “World’s Strongest Man” are also filled with self doubt. This is contrasted with a young boy testing his mental strength by confronting pedestrians with his attempts to walk between couples holding hands. That this is set in the least macho London suburb of Hampstead I took to be significant! His website is http://www.michalplata.com/

Tomasz Kobialka, Pearl Diving for Wyrms

koblaska

Kobialka’s installation of this digital video in a carpeted room only four-foot high and his narrator’s sub basso profundo growl add to the undertow of menace.  The alpha male elements of video game culture are presented as an inescapable rule. But this contrasts with the benign innovation – a virtual worm (or wyrm) with a simple genotype which is seen as the holy grail in that it mimics a living organism contrasting with the typical mythical scaly monster that otherwise prowls around this video. Is he suggesting that we will soon be satiated by online fantasy and seek instead to fashion a virtual reality indistinguishable from the “real” world?

Robbie Howells, ACG in practice

ACG

A perfect example of channeling controlled anger is seen in Robbie Howells’ hilarious parody of a corporate animation promo which supposedly launches a collaborative venture between artists and business while giving a chilling commentary on freemasonry, viewable at http://acginpractice.co.uk/.  Along with the accompanying video by his artist alter ego “Katie South” on the “architecture of ritual spaces,” his satire encompasses the troubling, darker question of the rigged world we are all in thrall to. His experience at Millwall F.C. recorded succinctly in a text piece is a crushing indictment of the exploitation of young artists by business.

So, overall an abundance of  MI treats. You have until 7.00 pm Monday 17th July to experience them.

 

 

 

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